Tuesday 19 December

Australia backs down on plans to charge Kiwi students higher fees

Kiwis studying at Australian universities will retain their access to government-subsidised fees…

Ako Aotearoa Appoints Helen Lomax Acting-Director

Ako Aotearoa is delighted to announce the appointment of Helen Lomax as its Acting-Director – to take effect from the beginning of February next year for a period of six months…

Early Childhood Council calls for balanced view

The Early Childhood Council (ECC) says so-called research released today about the early childhood education (ECE) sector lacks integrity and needs to be taken with a grain of salt …

School Newsletters & Visits Key Sources of Information

Delving into the school bag for the newsletter remains a reality for parents and whānau of primary and intermediate students. School newsletters remain the main source of information about their child’s school for parents and whānau, although the newsletter is more likely to be digital in higher decile schools.

‘Parents and whānau also reported school visits as the most helpful source of information for choosing a school,’ Senior Researcher Linda Bonne said. ‘Over 50% said a school visit or open day had helped them, with school websites a distant second at 19%.’

The findings are from the New Zealand Council for Educational Research (NZCER) National Survey of Primary and Intermediate Schools 2016.

Weak parental support for national standards

Fewer than half of parents support the national standards in reading, writing and maths – and only five percent consider the controversial benchmarks when choosing a school for their children.

The findings – from the Council for Educational Research national survey of primary and intermediate schools – were published just a week after the government announced the demise of the standards.

Few Schools Able to Develop Students’ Te Reo Māori Skills

Students who start with high proficiency in te reo Māori are unlikely to be supported to further develop their reo Māori skills in English-medium schools. While many teachers think it is important students learn te reo Māori, very few are able to use the language at more than a basic level.

These findings are from the New Zealand Council for Educational Research (NZCER) National Survey of Primary and Intermediate Schools 2016. The latest report to be released from the survey focuses on the experience of ākonga Māori (Māori students) in English-medium schools.

Ministers welcome commitment to te reo

Associate Education Ministers Kelvin Davis and Jenny Salesa have welcomed schools’ commitment to tikanga Māori and te reo Māori.

A New Zealand Council for Educational Research report Ākonga Māori in English-medium primary and intermediate schools, released today, shows a majority of principals recognise the importance of te reo Māori and tikanga Māori for all students.

Most teachers are using te reo Māori

Most teachers are using te reo Māori at some level in the classroom, a survey has found.

The Council for Educational Research council’s national survey of primary and intermediate schools found just 1 percent never use the language with students.

Mainstream dead end for reo learners

The Council for Education Research has confirmed what many Maori whanau have found – that students who start with high proficiency in te reo Maori are unlikely to be supported to further develop their reo skills in English-medium schools…

This NZ Education News feed will resume on 15 January 2018. Happy holidays.

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